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of course. so trying to -- china is a much interest in canadian energy and natural resources. we are very much interested in building trust, strategic trust and cooperation with china. and from enable perspective, of course, i'll give you one sort of anecdote. you were referring to this the islands, two months ago i attended the western pacific naval symposium hosted -- and have the opportunity to sit between the deputy commander of the people's liberation army navy, and the commander of the ambassadors japanese maritime self-defense force, a euphemism for the japanese navy. it was at a time when the island was leading on cnn and bbc. i thought as i was sitting between two them there's an opportunity for a canadian to do something extraordinary from an naval diplomatic perspective and put this thing to bed. [laughter] >> how did that go? >> not too well, not too well. [laughter] which is my point. i spoke with the chinese admirals interpreter. i spoke with admiral commander in english, a great conversation. but never was the bridge build or even considered. and i think one of the key issu
and this brings back sweet memories of when china was very isolated during the cold war. in the end, there's a whole new generation of people who have been much more sophisticated understanding, but that i would say it's a very strong autonomic response to the united states beefing up its forces in australia and then they wake up one morning and burma has flipped on them. it was eternal in terms of their faithful allies. these things caused a lot of consternation. so the old fear of diagnostically speaking in china is to fear with sand and travel without. these things happening around them excite them. >> how much does it add to that anxiety is that all? >> is the most problematic relationship now in japan and this is not good. i have to say i think japan probably hasn't played this as well as it might have, but i think on the other hand it would be fair to say also that it serves china's purposes to have something happening outside his orders which can rally people at home. there's a lot of complex things going on in each of these reactions to foreign movements outside. >> which ma
will look at the new communist party of leadership in china and that impact on u.s.- china relations. hosted by the center for strategic and international studies in washington, this is an hour. i'd also like to recognize former ambassador to china jim sasser who's sitting right there, one of my close friends. thank you for coming, senator. glad to see you. well, the panel is a really good one, kurt campbell, assistant secretary of state for east asia and pacific affairs. he became -- came to that job in 2009, previously the ceo and co- founder of the center for a new american security. he was a professor at harvard, associate professor of public policy and international relations at the kennedy school. chris johnson, senior adviser and freeman chair in china studies here at csis. his most important public service, as far as i'm concerned, is he gave me a lot of help in preparing for the presidential debate. and i'll be -- always be grateful for that, chris. he's frequently advised senior white house, cabinet, congressional, military and foreign officials on chinese leadership and on beijing
and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 split between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has rein
hard currency on the open market. >> and though the soviet empire is a thing of the past, china is echoing the aspirations of its predecessor. >> there's no question that we're going to face a very serious challenge in the years to come, dealing with a rising china that wants to be dominant and hegemonic in its own region, wants to control sea lines of communication, wants to control the south china sea. and we have allies who stand to lose from that and look to us for support. i think that's the likeliest area of actual conflict. >> the pentagon will often say and right now the u.s. spends something like 4, 5, 6 times what china spends on its defense spending. and the big question then becomes what is china's intention? (instrumental music) >> in a national call to arms defense secretary leon panetta warned the threat of a significant cyber attack against america is already here. >> the collective result of these kinds of attacks could be a cyber pearl harbor. >> what are the threats american's face in this century? with the attacks of september 11th, the u.s. has had to comple
history tv on c-span3. >> china's emerging global power and maritime strategy were the focus of a panel discussion at the halifax international security forum. panelists discuss the territorial disputes involving japan in the east china sea, cybersecurity and international diplomacy. this is an hour, ten minutes. >> welcome back, everybody. this session for miscalculation, china and the rise of confusion or confucianism. i'd like to hand over to steve clemens who's moderating this session. .. >> thank you all for joining us. when i was thinking about the title today and thinking about our panel, it occurred to me, and i went online to find a chinese event that is being held right now looking at u.s. grand strategy, canada, japan and india. there are no canadian, japanese americans or canadians on china's panel. don't have any chinese with us today but we should have a lot of fun discussing that our national strategies but involving in the asian pacific region and with china but i want to acknowledge that that voice wasn't with us today. that might give us more room to run. because we do
india and china to develop into a completely distinct world civilizations without having much to do with each other for long-term history. let's take that image that you offered of america, this amazingly simple geographic place with all of these natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave to the development to rate civilization and european civilization and began to make powerful use of those the geographical advantages are obvious, so help us think about why it's geography that we should focus on as opposed to the cultural or civilization will aspect. >> that was due to the development of the failing chips which enable the croswell landed voyages, so that development of technology while it is short in distance it did not negate, it made it more important because it opened up a whole new geography and the world trade system cultural and economics flow from the geography because what is culture? it is the accumulated experience of a specific people on may specifically and skate over hundreds of thousands of years that l
counterterrorism, and then the u.s. ambassador to china, gary locke, on the relationship between the two countries. >> our first experience was to come in a different way than every other family up here. probably never happen again in history. and it's interesting because after dad was sworn in, we went and took a picture, photo of the family, behind the oval office desk, and that night we didn't get to move into the white house because nixon had left so quickly, so unexpectedly, they left their daughter and son-in-law, david eisenhower, to pack all their clothes and belongings. it literally took seven or eight days. we had to go back to our little house in alexandria, virginia, suburbia, the neighborhood was surrounded by secret service. we had been living there dad was vice president. and i'll never forget. that night mom is cooking dinner. literally, we're sitting around the dinner table, and mom is cooking dinner, and she looked over at my dad and goes, gerry, something is wrong here. you just became president of the united states and i'm still cooking. >> steve ford, linda johnson robb, and j
of course its friend, china is on the security council and has blocked those kind of actions in the past, jenna. jenna: interesting that you mentioned china. is there any indication that the north koreans had help from the outside? any sort of outside country with this launch? >> reporter: well there is no evidence per se but it is widely known that the north koreans could not get the parts for their ballistic missile program without having those parts flown through china, bypassed through china. there also have been reports on the voice of america that an iranian team of scientists have been seen recently, in recent days in north korea. so there is questions about the relationship between, and any help that may have been provided to the north koreans by the iranians. clearly the north koreans are very proud of this long range ballistic missile launch. the one in april failed miserably. and for the first time then they admitted that it did fail publicly. this time they extended the window and did not invite foreign journalists to watch this and simply announced when it was successful. th
, with russia and china, containment when it came to russia was countering their expansive capabilities. >> rose: right. >> our own -- when it came to their nuclear capability we were talking about deterrence. >> rose: right. >> and so i think first we want to contain iranian influence in the region, but i think the question that people are -- that what the president is really addressing is, or would we be content with deterrence? >> right. >> and there i think the difference in the ayatollahs and their religious, their they cratic approach to the world, their threats to destroy israel make them a more worrisome, significantly more worrisome possess sorry of nuclear weapons than other nuclear states. >> rose: because they have a different decision al type structure. >> yes. >> rose: from russia, and the soviet union from going into europe once again, deterrence is mutually assured destruction. and so then, does the question of value and life, different because of a culture that can produce suicide bombers mean that there -- means that will not work in the end or do you say no nationable and the
's turn to the global economy. associated press reporting that china has surpassed the u.s. as the leading trade partner. this comes as china announces the inflation rate rose 2% one month alone. sign of an economy gaining strength. what does it mean? brenda buttner, anchor of "bulls and bears." i was reading this article where shoppers in beijing have seen the prices of vegetables double in one week alone. inflation is a problem over there. what is causing it? >> basically it's not a bad problem, it's growth. china has numbers we can only dream of, growth of about 8%, we're below 2%. their factory output was up 10%. retail sales, 15%. so it is basically growth driven not supply side driven which is the kind of inflation you want to see. it's only 2%, that is well below the target of 4% is. it came down from 6.7%. >> gregg: so it's an issue not really a problem and outweighed by the huge growth. how does the inflation american consumers if at all? >> we buy a lot from china. it may be that some of the input may be more expensive. we may have to pay more, but it's more that china is becomin
, as of right now china owns $1.15 trillion of our debt. then, number two on the list, is japan with $1.13 trillion of our debt. now, this is interesting. out of this debt number three on the list is opec. opec is an entity. that's the countries of ecuador and venezuela and india and bahrain and iran and iraq and kuwait and amman and qatar and saudi arabia and the u.a.e., algeria, ga been a, -- gabon, nigeria. they're now number three on the list and they own $267 billion of our debt. brazil comes in at number four, $250.5 billion. and then number five on the list, new to the list, the top five list, the caribbean banking centers. now own $240.4 billion of u.s. debt. by the way, caribbean banking centers are the bahamas, bermuda, cayman islands, netherlands and panama. this is who owns us. this is who owns our debt. and this is why on this side of the aisle, what we continue to say is the spending has to be dealt with. we have seen -- we've heard from everybody. we are hearing from economists all around the globe. and they repeatedly say what we are saying, what we've been saying for ye
other. they discovered they were twin sisters separated from birth in china it is against the one of the girls was given up for adoption. they share mannerisms and they were married in the same year. the husband has the same first name. >> steve: and they dress alike. >> gretchen: what a fantastic story. the rest of the headlines ttook over 50 years for the murderer of a 7 year old to b brought to justice. jack mccullah will be sentenced for the murder. it is one of the oldest unsolved crimes. he was dismissed as a suspect but arrested last year after the investigation reopened. >> steve: meanwhile a 22 year old woman in oregon jumped in her car and drove off after two kids tried to rob her at gun point. the boys later to be found 7 and 11 years old. demanded money and her phone. >> i was afraid he would shoot my tires or window. i didn't think i was safe. >> brian: the boys were caught and turns out the gun was not loaded it is not known how they got the gun. they were turned over to their familis and the case is expected to go to jv court. >> brian: two students are accused of b
: the latest export from china seems to be college students. more and more chinese scholars are attend iting american institutions these days. supporters say it helps the university pay their bills but critics argue this trend has a downside. this holiday, share everything. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. shareable data across 10 devices with uimited talk and text. by htc for $49.99. i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night. is this a trick to get my spot? [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. >> harris: the hottest new thing in china seems to be the student, and at a time when student loan debt is greater than credit card debt, schools are increasingly looking overseas for a boost. according to a recent report, college kids from china now make up a quarter of all international students in american universities. the schools claim it helps with thei
, the rights of disabled americans including veterans who may travel the country such as china or russia or mali or any other country that may choose to adopt this treaty. if the senate desires to protect rights of disabled americans who travel abroad, the senate would do better to encourage other nations to model their own reforms, their own internal legal structures after the americans with disabilities act, which 20 years after its passage still send a message that disabled americans will always have fair access to housing, employment and education in this nation. i've mentioned a few things to treaty does not do. i like to few things to treaty does do that cause me some concern. article xxxiv establishes a committee with the rights of persons with disabilities. this committee will establish its own rules of procedure and parties to the treaty are required to submit reports every four years. in general, u.n. human rights treaty committees have made demands the state parties that fall well outside of the legal, social, economic and cultural traditions and norms of state parties. someti
nouri al-maliki said the demonstrations were not acceptable. the government of china imposed tighter controls on internet usage today. now, china's 500 million web users will have to provide their real names when they register for internet service. and providers must delete any web content deemed illegal, and report it to authorities. leading writers and bloggers insisted it's a new way for china's communist leaders to censor their critics. >> ( translated ): since the internet came into china, the chinese government has been repeatedly imposing restrictive measures, such as shielding, blocking and banning. it has even spent billions of dollars to build a firewall against overseas sites. they just don't want to see any freedom of speech which is provided by the constitution because it will hurt their vested interest. >> holman: the new curbs come in the wake of a series of online discussions that have helped expose corruption scandals. russian president vladimir putin signed a bill into law today banning americans from adopting russian children. the move terminated more than 50 ado
.n. security council. it's likely china will try to water down those provisions but it's also certain that the provisions will pass. >> you don't think china will try to veto it? >> i don't think they will veto it. they don't want north korea doing this. >> china is the only ally that they really have. i wonder, do you think it's possible they didn't inform china in advance of the timing of this launch? >> it's possible they did not. people now suspect that the information that we had that north korea was moving its rocket, something was wrong with it, was it an intentional deceptive move? they thought there would be attempts to shoot it down. they wanted to fool japan. they succeeded. >> and it certainly does strengthen the new young leader kim jong-un domestically. >> absolutely. they have been trying since 1998 to launch a long-range missile and they failed in the previous four attempts. they succeeded in this. it's not a rocket that can deliver a major warhead. there are marriajor hurdles to >> they have done in north korea where a lot of people are starving what south korea has b
constitution and the history of the rule of law. this interview was part of a discussion on china opposed the legal system hosted by the brookings institution. china's >> ok. concepts. for 20 years i have been advising -- roughly half of that on financial economic matters. the other half a variety of topics. about 10 years ago, we started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the states. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have
deficit to china being $29.8 billion per month. that is just one country. you start to add up all the trade deficit that we have with all of these different trading partners over the years, i am sure that it is close to about $1 trillion per year. >> thank you for the comments. let's go to sarasota next. caller: good afternoon. the way that i look at it, as a 74-year-old professional pharmacist with a minor in economics, the reason i am independent is because republicans and democrats cannot seem to get it together. the biggest problem that we have now is the reason why we cannot do what we are supposed to do for the entire country. one middleman adnan grover norquist. someone who was never even elected. here is a man that has caused all the problems. all of the republicans have signed this pledge, which to me is unconstitutional. without him, we would not be talking today. >> salem, oregon, republican line. you are on the air. caller: good morning. as a college student, and i have listened to every single caller, this is an embarrassing day for our country. i am a first-time job
years, there has been a lot more further people's republic of china and the string of pearls strategy into the indian ocean. pakistan is some most important city you have never heard of because the chinese got a post there to listen to ships going in and out of the straight of hormuz and they also have resource relationships with iran and sudan. and as i think you all know, records of those countries and how they tend to make war on their neighbors and also we have the china daily newspaper. its total propagandpropagand a for the peoples of china and i'm wondering, i think the chinese sold the ideas of -- which you might've studied at the naval academy but i'm wondering, in the next few years, with their lower number of ships and sequestration threat over us and the current expansion of chinese power, how would you best manage our military resources around the world? [laughter] >> thank you for the softball question. [laughter] admiral mullen when he was at her graduation as chief of naval operations come he told us to speak truth to power. as a junior officer, not to follow unethical
approach to this, and governor romney's statement labeling china a currency manipulator on day 1 suggests taking a tougher alignment with china may be an issue, is worth pursuing. we will see not an enormous change but probably a check up in preparation and confrontation, oversight. >> anyone else? >> i suspect on detention policy we won't see a lot of change. we did not see a lot of change from the bush and administration to the obama administration, the obama administration argued that the protection should not extend to the circuits, congress wanted to keep the courts out more than they have when they passed the military detention acts and everything else in 2006 and tried to correct for what they saw as the court trying to extend jurisdiction, they have established a line, i do not see they can't push back against that line and the battle lines that performed at this point. >> i basically agree with greg the obama administration continued, without any change whatsoever. and on the ground, on the question, with new detainee's, the legacy cases are not going anywhere. governor romney wo
a prerequisite. low cost living over all. we see gasoline prices dropping by $0.08. a lot of growth china not using as much oil. that is behind the price drop. >> some taking long trips on the holidays it is easier to stop along the way. >> some have stakeouts south carolina was the lowest. i will tell them to fill up the tanks there before we go on the road. >> a lot are pulling out the stops so they can spend some money. >> also get in the mood, too. bobble bar have a physical location in new york city they have free scotch in there to try to loosen them up and purchase a few more bobbles out there. the gap banana republic giving away a fee at. you have starbucks $250 gift card membership cards there with free coffee or a month. they are pulling out all of the stops to get you there. >> you have the least satisfying careers and most satisfying careers. >> my plan.com looked at the top 300 and bottom 300 of jobs out there. let's look at the least happy person. mail clerk. i am not talking about the box office. perhaps this is motivation to get out of the mail room and move up the ladder.
. it was shocking. >> i was trying to get away from the camp and i ended up going north. >> did you know where china was? >> not at all. >> it just happened that the way i was going was toward the border. with luck and kunning, shin managed to steal and bribe his way across the border and work his way through china where he would have been sent back where he was caught. in shanghai he was granted asylum. in 2006 he arrived in south korea with not a friend in the world. he was so overwhelmed with culture shock and post traumatic stress he had to be hospitalized. he is 30 you now and has made friends and built a new life for himself. but old demons from camp 14 are never far behind. he admit there's was something he was hiding. two years ago he confessed. >> when he told me about the excuse about his mother and brother he didn't say he turned them in. >> you reported your mother and brother? >> yes. >> what did you hope to get out of reporting them? >> well, being full for the first time. >> more food? >> yes, but the biggest reason was i was supposed to report it. >> why was shin tortured after ratti
their livelihoods when the factory across the street from us closes their doors in november, movinr,to china, taking around 170 jobs with them. >> the bain capital board has made their decision. the cdo has made his decision. -- ceo has made his decision. we believe the only person in the world who can stop these jobs from the move is mitt romney. >> in the latest sign of global warming, guys in the arctic has shrunk to its smallest area since record-keeping began. >> there are people who rely on the arctic ocean. if the ice melts, it is a scary thought. it is who we are, is where the animals migrate. my elders, the community elders rely on their vitamins, the traditional foods that the ocean supplies. >> i'm sorry, i will stop the subsidy to pbs and other things. i love big bird, i like you, too, but i'm not going to keep on spending money to borrow from china to pay for. >> labor protests against the largest private employer, walmart, is expanded to 28 stores in 12 states. organizers describe the action as the first retail workers' strike in walmart's history. >> i work in the warehouse in illinoi
to year. it is hard to estimate countries like china because they are now pricing things the same way. they have large land forces and they are not deployed across the world. submarines and missiles. china is probably number one on the list. host: this from twitter. guest: that refers to overseas contingency operations. this is a fund that paid for the wars in iraq. it is about $88 billion in that account. there is a pentagon and washington funny math. some people say if the project out, we will save all this money. i wrote a report about saving $1 trillion. most of our troops will be out of afghanistan by 2014. nobody expects it will spend this level of money going out the long term in the future. so the $1 trillion in savings is money we would not have spent anyway. there are some built-in drawdowns in the defense department. in.se were built an about $487 billion over 10 years. they are coming back down. about 100,000 or so and they are built into the system. the pentagon is looking at things that way. host: roger in texas, republican caller. go ahead. caller: i am amazed i got thr
as china with the issue of human rights. as long as the international community does not address the interests of the importance stakeholders, that is not really going to help. what is your take on that? >> i think they have very short form policy. i have been in moscow and we met with the russian minister of foreign affairs. syria and russia have a relationship. we need to keep such a relationship, but with such short policies by defending the assad regime, you of making such a relationship very difficult. i think the syrians see russia the same as they see the assad regime. when you see your brother and sister being killed every day -- i have been in syria and i have lots of examples. when the syrian people solve all of this happen for them, of course, they will change their position on russia. i think for russia to keep their ambassador, it is difficult to keep him in damascus. any government in the future, they will put their relationship with russia and iran as a priority. there are many voices within the opposition, and the syrian government should be open to negotiations a
with this, the british, the french, the germans, russia, china, they all tend to view this as a proliferation problem. the conversation between iran and the other side tends to be about that issue, very narrowly focused. to kind of move that conversation, you have to figure out a different kind of architecture. the five plus one process, as such, is designed to deal with the corporation issue and the composition is that has to do with the iranian violation of the mpt and there have been 62 -- six security council resolutions that suggests sanctions. there are two countries who suggest that the issue between -- that this is not a proliferation issue but has to do with the character of the regime and one of them is israel who does not view this as strictly an arms dispute and the second one is iran who similarly suggests that although it is an arms control issue, they are really using arms control as a way to undermine the regime. there are two actors in this particular conflagration who are not accepting the argument being that this is about nuclear infractions as oppo
but also offer a great opportunity. you see, what i find in africa today is that china has an increasing presence on that continent. china has a plan when it comes to the future of africa. america does not. that's why i'm going to offer as an amendment to the tag bill, which is currently pending before the senate, the american jobs through greater exports to africa act. my partners on the bill are senator chris coons, senator ben cardin, john boozman and mary landrieu, as well as support in the house from representative chris smith. at the heart of this bill is the creation of jobs in america. exporting more goods to africa will help create jobs here. every $1 billion in exports supports over 5,000 jobs. i believe we can increase exports from the united states to africa by 200% in real dollars over the next ten years, and we can't wait any longer. if there are some who say africa is so backward and so far behind, what is it in the united states they can afford to buy if they even wanted to, that is old thinking. let me give you some new reality. in the past ten years six of the world's f
. as far as china is concerned, we don't tariff, we don't put that high of a tariff on their imports but yet i don't know the exact numbers but i believe it's a lot higher that they tax our imports in their country. and the whole thing with jobs. he created the apple scommuret in california in his garage but yet when he got successful he moves all his company over to china, giving chinese people jobs. if steve jobs was born in china he wouldn't even have a garage therefore he wouldn't be able to create the apple computer. so i just think we just don't do enough for the people of this country. and the people who are in position to create jobs and do this do not reinvest in the country. therefore i don't think they should get tax breaks. if you want to give these corporate giants tax breaks then give it to those who want to invest in the country, who want to create jobs here, not overcease, and they think try to think of ways to get their money over there into here lower than say the american businessman paying 35%. guest: i mean, i understand your frustration. i think part of it is th
not create any jobs. as far as china is concerned we do not hit that high of a tariff on their imports. i believe it is a lot higher. the whole thing was steve jobs. he treated the apple computer in his garage. when he got successful theme of his company over to china giving chinese people jobs. if steve jobs was born in china he would not even be able to create the apple computer. we just do not do enough for the people of this country. the people who are position to create jobs do not reinvest in the country. i do not think they should get tax breaks. if you want to give these corporate giant tax breaks given to those who want to invest in the country and create jobs. for a lower than the american businessmen. guest: i understand your frustration. part of it is the corporate tax .ode clearly needs to fix it a lot talk about fixing a and a revenue neutral way. it does not help lowering future deficits any easier. there are some things need to change. in general we need to realize that if we set our country on the bike path making the right investments in -- the right path making investme
panels in the world in china, also bought one of the solar panels. so they have brought a lot of money in for that small college. we need to have consistency in america and committing ourselves to preserving the environment, protecting us from global warming which is real and we need leadership coming from the white house every day saying we need to do something about global warming. that hasn't happened yet. my hope is in president obama's second term he'll be the leader of the world and not lagging behind the other nations in doing something about global warming. >> you're a nuclear engineer at one point, promoted nuclear energy. how do you make the distinction between nuclear energy for good use, good purposes, and for bad use? and iran's argument that they are creating nuclear energy for power and not as a threat to the united states, speak to the link between energy and national security. >> i was in charge of a development of the second atomic submarine and i was an early nuclear physicist. that was my graduate work. i had what's convinced then and now nuclear power for peaceful
or machete does the same. look at china. look at what they are doing to school kids in china today with aged weapons do. we register those? >> although the lethality is different there. >> how many were killed most recently in china? >> 27 were stabbed and they all survived. none died. >> they have other lethal ones as well. >> there were several multiple killings with -- >> we'll return to this topic tomorrow and talk about regulation. but i would love to have you both back at the table and you guys as well. ta-nehesi coates, richard lucibella, haley elkins and jackie hilly. thank you. look, if you have copd like me, you know it can be hard to breathe, and how that feels. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urin
working actively in china to buy european- american-chinese goods. the government is not completed, but they're not doing enough. we're thinking that pressure needs to be brought on china. goods made in germany, sold by that company to the chinese company that thinks it will keep it in china, but in fact it is going to iran. all it a country of tr concern. we're thinking maybe it is time that china is called out on that. china needs to be pressured to stop a local in the system internationally that is being created to keep iran from outfitting its centrifuge program. that effort over time has had tremendous success. with more and more sanctions, it is been more successful. more purchases stopped, more interdiction's, more trouble for iran to make progress. >> in terms of u.s. non- proliferation programs, david is emphasizing some of the holes that exist, particularly in controls and lack of enforcement of existing sanctions legislation. what is your assessment of non- proliferation programs? >> when you hear discussions on sanctions, these are the things we tried to do to cut off s
with china. he goes into panama, in december '89 -- never forgot that because i had -- born on the 4th of july was opening that day, and the american people loved it. they backed the invasion. it was our backyard, it was a war on drugs and that was new issue now. communist had been forgotten. noriega was the new stalin, and then a year later, we had this iraq 1, and that's another untold story. iraq 1 was really depressing when you go into all the false intelligence and the doctoring of the photos. do you want to tell us about that? it breaks my heart personally, and as a veteran of the vietnam war, i see the next ten years we drift. we don't take advantage of the possibles with the soviet union, to keep it stable. we privatize with russia and then by the time the bush 43 comes in, it's not only squandered but the nightmare begins. so it's heartbreaking. >> did you want to comment? >> we see it as a lost opportunity. there's a lot of lost opportunities in the 20th 20th century, in march 5, 1965, when stall yip dies, the stove yet leaders reach out the united states and talk about endin
in essence would serve as sanctions on iran but the point is that china needs to be pressured to stop the loophole in the system internationally that is being created to keep iran from the centrifuge program, and that effort overtime has had tremendous success, and with more and more sanctions it has been more successful. more purchase is stopped, more interdictions and more trouble for iran to make progress on the gas centrifuge program. >> in terms of the nonproliferation program, and david is emphasizing some of the holes that exist particularly in the export controls and the lack of enforcement of existing sanctions legislation what is your assessment of the u.s. nonproliferation program or what can be done and should be done? >> when you hear the sanctions, those are all the things we try to do. and so, there are four things that can be done to force things to have better training in the region if you will, but we also need to look at the demand side as well. what drives the countries to proliferate and then how do you also built in that notion of a non-proliferation, how do you
would be short yen and long japanese stocks. >> people watching not just january but china. ir ir ir iron oar a lot. >> let's get more insight from steve from web bush securities. how much of a nail biter is this for you in terms of fiscal cliff and the markets? >> i think pretty clear at this point that if there's a deal coming, it's gonna be coming very, very soon. i think the markets discounted the fact we are going to get some sort of deal t has held up fairly well here and i think if we don't get a deal, we will see a selloff. i don't know how considerable, but certainly see the 2, 3% decline in the market. >> does it amaze you, steve, that the markets, in your view, still consider a given that we are going to reach a deal? here we are thursday, december 27th. they still haven't issued a 48-hur notice for congress to return to capitol hill and yet you're saying the markets have baked in some sort of deal? >> yeah, i think so. i don't in he isly think the deal happened december 31st. if we pass waite without a deal earthquake the market will think something is going to happen in
expensive to do business in countries like china. our workers have become even more productive. our energy costs are starting to go down here in the united states. and we still have the largest market. so when you factor in everything, it makes sense to invest here, in america. and that's one of the reasons why american manufacturing is growing at the fastest pace since the 1990s. and thanks in part to that boost in manufacturing, four years after the worst economic crisis of our lifetimes, our economy is growing again. our businesses have created more than 5.5 million new jobs over the past 33 months. so we're making progress. [applause] we're moving in the right direction. we're going forward. so what we need to do is simple. we need to keep going. we need to keep going forward. we should do everything we can to keep creating good middle- class jobs that help folks rebuild security for their families. [applause] and we should do everything we can to encourage companies like daimler to keep investing in american workers. and by the way, what we shouldn't do -- i just got to say this -- wh
deal, it will be one of the largest ever by chinese investors. china's state owned oil giant c-nook swooped in to acquire nexen for a cool $15 billion. note to the obama administration, it is not happening in a bubble. last year you'll recall the obama administration put off a decision on the excel pipeline, an extension of a pipeline that would connect the oil in alberta to the gulf of mexico and international markets. the democrats killed it because of concerns from environmentalists. the proposed route crossed the aquifer in nebraska and white house and state department officials could have just insisted on rerouting the pipe, but they didn't. a bad move, one that was highly thought to play to the president's base. now that the elections are over, a review of a new route will begin sometime next year. the leakages of that pipe were a minor concern, though it got all the headlines. a more legitimate environmental concern is carbon emissions. processing crude that is mined from the oil sands emits double the emissions of regular drilled oil. but oil sands still -- that still s
of bermuda. >> reporter: they can take it to singapore or china. it doesn't to come back to america. there is no law which says if you make money overseas it must come back here. megyn: now they are getting upset overseas. the french tax authority removed computer files in italy. the tax police searched the come numbers milan offices. they say they don't believe they are paying their fair share of tax. that may or may not be true. but if it's legal how much can they do? >> reporter: it's perfectly legal. they investigated various companies and put pressure object them from a public relations standpoint. starbucks, for example, they weren't forced to hand over money but they were pressured into making a special payment of $10 million pounds, $16 million to the british chancellor of the exchequer. they did it for good p.r. maybe something similar will happen with google. they don't have to pay. they have done perfectly legal stuff. megyn: he reportedly turned down being treasury secretary, or the new secretary of business. he says it's called capitalism. we are proud to be capitalisti
taken offline. >>> video from shanghai china shows a giant shark tank at a shopping mall -- wow -- suddenly shatters spectators swept away as the water spills out. 16 people were hurt there, some were cut by the flying glass. three sharks were killed in the incident. it's believed that glass fell apart because it was too old. >> yikes. >> unbelievable. >> they're going to have to go back and get a new hot pretzel. >> how do you get sharks in a mall? okay. >> i can't answer that question. i hope someone can. >> get into >>> the widow of slain army ranger pat tillman is speaking out in a rare interview. marie tillman tells jeff glor about the private side of her late husband that we never knew and her surprising second chance at love. you're watching "cbs this morning." love. you're watching "cbs this morning." [ sniffs ] i have a cold. [ sniffs ] i took dayquil but my nose is still runny. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't treat that. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ br
military in china. this was signed off on by the defense secretary, leon panetta who used to be a cia chief and by general david petraeus who stepped down as cia chief after an extramarital affair was exposed last month, as for funding, the pentagon gave the dcs about 100 million dollars just to get the program started, but their overall budget is not expected to grow. in fact, the overall budget, the dia overall budget might decrease since just about every part of the government is looking to cut back right now and the money from the dcs and the personnel are just essentially going to be converted from the existing defense intelligence agency over to the defense clandestine service. >> that's what we need. an expansion of the government. >> thank you so much, peter. >> thanks, peter. >> all right, let's get your headlines now, and show you what's happening around the world. thousands of egyptians took to the streets, showing support for their president. all right, this is the scene in cairo as egyptians rally behind president morsi. on december 15th there will be a vote on a new constituti
americans with with disabilities. when they go to saudi arabia, when they go to china, india, when they go around the world, this is saying the other places dignity and respect and access matter for people. and the terms of equality that exist in law, should apply to those with disabilities. i can't believe that would be controversial and you would have essentially only 61 senators in the united states senate vote yes on this. >> the republicans, i'm not going to go into rick santorum's black helicopter conspiracy theory on this because i don't want to dignify it with verbiage, but i recognize the republicans have crazy conspiracy theories about the u.n. the thing that strikes me about this one in particular is that you had bob dole and john mccain and all these republicans. >> none of them can be republicans today. they are talking about chuck hagel. possibly getting a position in the administration. what is bob dole? what is john mccain? are they rhinos? that's what it means is that the republican party has moved so far away from their standard bearers. i think it was one of the saddest
then we got regulation in china. in 1911 in the u.s. we had the triangle shirt waist fire that led to deaths and that wound up giving us more regulations. sometimes regulation saves lives. remember that the next time you see the anti-regulatory fever that you see so many other places on television. all right let's bring in teresa hahn the director of a labor rights organization, and they were the ones conducting investigations of working conditions in factories around the globe. teresa, do you have a sense of when walmart said those are too expensive, we can't do it. how true or untrue is that relative to their cost? is it really that would be prohibitively expensive or a regular course of business? >> it's something that walmart absolutely has the financial ability to do and could do it for a relatively small part of their overall finances. it's a matter of political will in walmart and the companies are not willing to put forward to them what is a relatively small amount of money that would ultimately save the lives of hundreds if not thousands of their workers for their supplier
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